The Boston Buddha Blog

“The greatest gift you can give someone is your presence.”  ― Thích Nhất Hạnh

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I like to think that the greatest gift you can give to anyone this holiday season is to get your sh!% together.  =)

The Holidays are a time of joy, love, family, friends… and stress.  Don’t get me wrong, I love the Holiday season.  Nothing makes me happier than seeing the look on my kids face when they’re opening their gifts on Christmas morning.  But… between the physical demands of always being on the go – running from one party to another – and the extra emotional energy needed to catch up with family and friends… not to mention socializing with colleagues at company parties, the Holidays can be VERY stressful.  Add in an ample supply of cookies, candy canes, caffeine, and some extra Nog, you’re bound to get some heightened physical and emotional reactions to your stress.

In order to slow things down so we can really enjoy the Holiday season this year we need to start planning NOW.  Here are five tips that will help you manage your stress levels over the Holiday season.

Continue reading »

 
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Wait, I’m multitasking on my Princess Phone!

Active listening is the essence of meditation. It’s also the only thing that really matters in relationships.

As we explore our relationships, what matters most is staying present, being empathetic, knowing how to pay attention and to listen, holding space for difficult emotions, and regulating our emotions. All of these are directly trained through meditation practice.

If you’ve ever been with someone who is not listening to you, not really there with you, isn’t empathetic, you sense it, and you don’t feel as though you’re being heard. What is fundamental to a relationship is being seen, feeling heard, and understood. So the first thing meditation does is train us how to actually be present. How to focus our attention on this moment as we connect with that other person.

Even as a meditation teacher it is challenging for me to practice what I preach.  That’s exactly WHY I practice. Everyone’s mind wanders… a lot. Mindfulness helps me build up these critical skills (through those mental pushups) that positively influence my relationships.

I hope this helps!
– Andy

 

New York Times Best Selling Author, Celebrity Fitness trainer  Chalene Johnson recently asked me to be a guest on her podcast show!  I’d love for you to take a listen below and let me know your thoughts…Andy_Kelley_2

 

The Chalene Show – Podcasts – Meditation For People Who Dont Get It But Really Need It

Today is the day that I start my journey towards understanding if meditation has a place in my daily routine.  I’m speaking Andrew Kelley, a.k.a. “The Boston Buddha”.  Andy answers all of my rapidly-paced questions about meditation: Do I have to close my eyes? Do I have to sit with my legs crossed? Where should I meditate and for how long? And, most importantly, WHY should I meditate?

Fact: A lot of very successful people meditate. Another fact: I don’t. However, it seems like everywhere I turn, another super successful person is mentioning how important meditation is to them  on a daily basis. I already have a process that I go through every morning: plan my day, make my bed, stop and take a moment of gratitude, pray, exercise –  is there even room for meditation?

Some common questions about meditation:

Do I have to close my eyes?

Andy says, “No,” but he does recommend that as you’re starting, you should block out as many distractions as possible – and closing your eyes helps.

Do I have to sit with my legs crossed?

Nope. Andy says the idea is to be comfortable and that early practitioners of meditation didn’t have comfy couches like we do.

Why should I meditate?

People who practice and endorse meditation say that it helps them re-focus their mind and also provides them with a sense of calm. Andy says he started meditating because he was having a hard time sleeping and he was pleasantly surprised that it only took one week for his sleeping habits to improve.

When should I meditate?

There is no “right’ time, but you might have to make meditating a priority in your schedule. Many people meditate in the morning because there is nothing else scheduled at that time – it’s quiet and there are no pressing demands on their time. You’ll need to find the time that works best for yourself.

Lastly, JOIN ME ON MY 30-DAY CHALLENGE THROUGH MEDITATION!

Visit THIS Facebook post and tell us how you’re doing!

CONNECT WITH CHALENE:

Chalene on Facebook: www.facebook.com/chalene

Chalene on Instagram: www.instagram.com/chalenejohnson

Chalene on Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/chalenejohnson

Chalene on Twitter: www.twitter.com/chalenejohnson

Chalene on Youtube: www.youtube.com/chalenejohnson

Some of Chalene’s Instagram Accounts:

www.instagram.com/instagramimpact

www.instagram.com/pushmedaily

www.instagram.com/homeworkouts_4u

www.instagram.com/chalenefashion

Want more great tips and resources on improving balance, energy, organization, health fitness, relationships, focus, faith and happiness? Each episode of my podcast, The Chalene Show is designed to give you strategies and simple steps you can implement today to become a better, more balanced, happier version of yourself. LISTEN NOW!

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Andy with his spiritual guru and wife Catharine

Andy recently sat down with About Meditation‘s Morgan Dix to talk about mindfulness and meditation.  In this interview, we learn about the events that led to Andy becoming the Boston Buddha, and we explore his approach to teaching meditation in corporations and schools.

I invited Andy to the show because he’s passionate about helping people change their mental habits through meditation to achieve deeper happiness and fulfillment. He’s full of practical wisdom and teaching tips that will help you hone your own meditation practice.

In this interview, the Boston Buddha and I explore:

  • How Andy became a meditation teacher
  • The benefits of different styles of meditation
  • Why he does mantra-based meditation in the morning and mindfulness-based meditation in the afternoon
  • How to strengthen the neural networks associated with attention
  • How to change the stories we tell ourselves
  • Why it’s important to pick one practice technique and stick with it
  • How he came to be called the Boston Buddha
  • Why he says that everyone is the Boston Buddha
  • How he teaches meditation to students from 8-18 years old
  • His unique 5-minute email meditation exercise for executives
  • Andy’s main advice for new meditators

Enjoy!

About Morgan Dix

Morgan Dix is a blogger who enjoys exploring the intersection of contemplative fitness and culture. He is a co-founder of About Meditation and contributes regular articles and guided meditations.